Frequently Asked Questions

What is included in your home inspection?

My comprehensive home inspection exceeds the ASHI Home Inspectors Standards of Practice. General areas covered include:
  • Roof
  • Exterior
  • Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure
  • Heating
  • Cooling
  • Plumbing
  • Electrical
  • Fireplace
  • Attic & Insulation
  • Doors, Windows & Interior

What is a home inspection?

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a home, from the roof to the foundation. Having a home inspected is like giving it a physical checkup. If problems or symptoms are found, the inspector may recommend further evaluation.

What sets you apart from other inspectors in your area?

My philosophy on inspections is simple. I am hired to inspect thoroughly and report clearly whatever conditions I find at the subject property, with the ASHI Standards of Practice as the minimum.
 
I am an advocate for my professional opinions only. I will neither document tiny flaws nor ignore noteworthy ones in order to improve a clients' position or gain the favor of anyone directly or indirectly involved in the sale of the home. My work is the same no matter who refers me. Hopefully this is exactly the kind of unbiased professional approach you value and rely upon to make intelligent buying decisions.
 
I'll use all of my experience, training, education, and common sense to perform the best, most thorough inspection I can. I work for my clients best interests in: educating them about the home they are considering buying. You will know whether or not the homes systems are safe, whether systems are installed like they are supposed to be, by providing a thorough, professional narrative report which includes digital photos. I'll verbalize as I go so if there are any questions I'll try to answer them to give you a better understanding of the home on site as well as in the finished report.

Why do I need a home inspection?

The purchase of a home is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. You should learn as much as you can about the condition of the property and the need for any major repairs before you buy, so that you can minimize unpleasant surprises and difficulties afterward.

Can a house fail an inspection?

No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of your prospective home. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value, or a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what may need further evaluation and/or repair or replacement.

What if the report reveals problems?

No house is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn't necessarily mean you shouldn't buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. A seller may adjust the purchase price or contract terms if major problems are found. If your budget is tight, or if you don't wish to become involved in future repair work, this information will be extremely important to you.

What does it include?

A home inspection will include a review of the condition of the home's central heating and air conditioning system, plumbing and electrical systems, the roof, attic, insulation. ventilation, walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors, the foundation, basement, structure, appliances, fixtures, exterior grading, concrete, and more.

Can't I do it myself?

Even the most experienced home owner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector who has inspected hundreds, perhaps thousands, of homes in his or her career. An inspector is familiar with the many elements of home construction, their proper installation, and maintenance. He or she understands how the home's systems and components are intended to function together, as well as how and why they fail.
 
Above all, most buyers find it very difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may affect their judgment. For the most accurate information, it is best to obtain an impartial third-party opinion by an expert in the field of home inspection.

When do I call in the home inspector?

A home inspector is typically contacted right after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed, and is often available within a few days. However, before you sign, be sure that there is an inspection clause in the contract, making your purchase obligation contingent upon the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms to which both the buyer and seller are obligated.
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